Using the Self-Select Paradigm to Delineate the Nature of Speech Motor Programming Purpose The authors examined the involvement of 2 speech motor programming processes identified by S. T. Klapp (1995, 2003)  during the articulation of utterances differing in syllable and sequence complexity. According to S. T. Klapp, 1 process, INT, resolves the demands of the programmed unit, whereas a second process, SEQ, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2009
Using the Self-Select Paradigm to Delineate the Nature of Speech Motor Programming
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David L. Wright
    Texas A&M University
  • Don A. Robin
    The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and University of Texas, San Antonio
  • Jooyhun Rhee
    Texas A&M University
  • Amber Vaculin
    Texas A&M University
  • Adam Jacks
    The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  • Frank H. Guenther
    Boston University
  • Peter T. Fox
    The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and University of Texas, San Antonio
  • Contact author: David L. Wright, Human Performance Laboratory, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4243. E-mail: d-wright@hlkn.tamu.edu.
  • Adam Jacks is now with the Department of Communication Disorders at Texas State University–San Marcos.
    Adam Jacks is now with the Department of Communication Disorders at Texas State University–San Marcos.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2009
Using the Self-Select Paradigm to Delineate the Nature of Speech Motor Programming
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 755-765. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0256)
History: Received November 20, 2007 , Revised July 1, 2008 , Accepted August 18, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 755-765. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0256)
History: Received November 20, 2007; Revised July 1, 2008; Accepted August 18, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose The authors examined the involvement of 2 speech motor programming processes identified by S. T. Klapp (1995, 2003)  during the articulation of utterances differing in syllable and sequence complexity. According to S. T. Klapp, 1 process, INT, resolves the demands of the programmed unit, whereas a second process, SEQ, oversees the serial order demands of longer sequences.

Method A modified reaction time paradigm was used to assess INT and SEQ demands. Specifically, syllable complexity was dependent on syllable structure, whereas sequence complexity involved either repeated or unique syllabi within an utterance.

Results INT execution was slowed when articulating single syllables in the form CCCV compared to simpler CV syllables. Planning unique syllables within a multisyllabic utterance rather than repetitions of the same syllable slowed INT but not SEQ.

Conclusions The INT speech motor programming process, important for mental syllabary access, is sensitive to changes in both syllable structure and the number of unique syllables in an utterance.

Acknowledgments
This work was partially supported by Grant R01 DC07683 from the National Institutes of Health, awarded to the sixth author. Thanks are extended to G. G. Weismer for comments and suggestions on earlier drafts of this article.
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