A Comparison of Video Versus Conventional Visual Reinforcement in 7- to 16-Month-Old Infants Purpose To compare response patterns to video visual reinforcement audiometry (VVRA) and conventional visual reinforcement audiometry (CVRA) in infants 7–16 months of age. Method Fourteen normal-hearing infants aged 7–16 months (8 male, 6 female) participated. A repeated measures design was used. Each infant was tested with VVRA and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2009
A Comparison of Video Versus Conventional Visual Reinforcement in 7- to 16-Month-Old Infants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristy J. Lowery
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Deborah von Hapsburg
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Erin L. Plyler
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Patti Johnstone
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Contact author: Kristy J. Lowery, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee, 424 South Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-0740. E-mail: klowery2@utk.edu.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2009
A Comparison of Video Versus Conventional Visual Reinforcement in 7- to 16-Month-Old Infants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 723-731. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0270)
History: Received December 11, 2007 , Accepted October 10, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 723-731. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0270)
History: Received December 11, 2007; Accepted October 10, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose To compare response patterns to video visual reinforcement audiometry (VVRA) and conventional visual reinforcement audiometry (CVRA) in infants 7–16 months of age.

Method Fourteen normal-hearing infants aged 7–16 months (8 male, 6 female) participated. A repeated measures design was used. Each infant was tested with VVRA and CVRA over 2 different sessions. The total number of head turns prior to habituation, hit rate (response consistency), false alarm rate, and sensitivity for each reinforcement condition were evaluated.

Results No significant differences were found between the 2 reinforcement methods for total number of head turns, hit rate, false alarm rate, or sensitivity. Overall, results showed no difference between the 2 reinforcer conditions in infants 7–16 months of age.

Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that infants in the 7- to16-month-old age range respond similarly to VVRA and CVRA as measured by response consistency and false alarm rate. VVRA is, therefore, a viable option for testing hearing in infants. However, prior to clinical implementation, the effectiveness of VVRA should be explored in infants with hearing loss.

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