Article  |   June 2009
Phonological Constraints on Children’s Production of English Third Person Singular –s
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Jae Yung Song, Department of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, Brown University, Box 1978, Providence, RI 02912. E-mail: Jae_Yung_Song@brown.edu.
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article   |   June 2009
Phonological Constraints on Children’s Production of English Third Person Singular –s
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research June 2009, Vol.52, 623-642. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0258)
History: Accepted 07 Oct 2008 , Received 20 Nov 2007 , Revised 12 Mar 2008
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research June 2009, Vol.52, 623-642. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0258)
History: Accepted 07 Oct 2008 , Received 20 Nov 2007 , Revised 12 Mar 2008

Purpose: Children variably produce grammatical morphemes at early stages of development, often omitting inflectional morphemes in obligatory contexts. This has typically been attributed to immature syntactic or semantic representations. In this study, the authors investigated the hypothesis that children’s variable production of the 3rd person singular morpheme –s interacts with the phonological complexity of the verb stem to which it is attached.

Method: To explore this possibility, the authors examined longitudinal data from the spontaneous speech of 6 English-speaking children between ages 1;3 and 3;6 (years;months) and elicited imitations from a cross-sectional study of 23 two-year-olds (mean age of 2;2).

Results: The results showed that children produced third person singular morphemes more accurately in phonologically simple coda contexts (e.g., sees) as compared with complex coda contexts (e.g., needs). In addition, children produced –s more accurately in utterance-final position as compared with utterance-medial position.

Conclusions: The results provide strong support for the role of phonological complexity in explaining some of the variability in children’s production of third person singular –s. This finding suggests that future research will need to consider multiple factors, including phonological and positional effects, in constructing a comprehensive developmental theory of both grammatical competence and processes of speech planning and production.

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