Comparing Abilities of Children With Profound Hearing Impairments to Learn Consonants Using Electropalatography or Traditional Aural.Oral Techniques Two groups of nine children with profound hearing impairments and low intelligibility were taught to produce the consonants /t,d,k,g,s,z∫/ using either electropalatographic (palatometry) or traditional aural-oral techniques. Testing was completed pre-, immediately post-, and 6 months post-treatment by examining productions of CV syllables (V=/i,a/) using electropalatography-determined linguapalatal contacts and listener ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1994
Comparing Abilities of Children With Profound Hearing Impairments to Learn Consonants Using Electropalatography or Traditional Aural.Oral Techniques
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul A. Dagenais
    University of South Alabama Mobile
  • Paula Critz-Crosby
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Samuel G. Fletcher
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Martin J. McCutcheon
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Contact author: Paul A. Dagenais, PhD, University of South Alabama, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, UCOM 2000, Mobile, AL 36688-0002.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1994
Comparing Abilities of Children With Profound Hearing Impairments to Learn Consonants Using Electropalatography or Traditional Aural.Oral Techniques
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1994, Vol. 37, 687-699. doi:10.1044/jshr.3703.687
History: Received February 17, 1993 , Accepted January 4, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1994, Vol. 37, 687-699. doi:10.1044/jshr.3703.687
History: Received February 17, 1993; Accepted January 4, 1994

Two groups of nine children with profound hearing impairments and low intelligibility were taught to produce the consonants /t,d,k,g,s,z∫/ using either electropalatographic (palatometry) or traditional aural-oral techniques. Testing was completed pre-, immediately post-, and 6 months post-treatment by examining productions of CV syllables (V=/i,a/) using electropalatography-determined linguapalatal contacts and listener identifications. Intelligibility was also measured using the CID Picture Speech Intelligibility Evaluation (SPINE) test. Both groups improved their consonant productions as a result of 26 50-minute sessions. Sessions were given twice daily over 3- to 4-week training periods. Immediately post-treatment, the electropalatography-trained subjects produced better consonants as measured by linguapalatal contact patterns and listener identifications. The linguapalatal-contact patterns learned by the electropalatography-trained group better matched normal speaker productions than did those of the traditionally trained group. Both groups showed equal improvement for both post-treatment conditions when tested with the CID SPINE test. Although further research is needed, the results of this study suggest that electropalatographic techniques are, at least, equal alternatives to traditional aural-oral speech training techniques for speakers with profound hearing impairments.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a National Institutes of Health Grant NS24697. The authors would like to thank the Alabama School for the Deaf (ASD) for their cooperation in completing this project and specifically Janet Stiff and Judy Johnson of ASD for their assistance. Appreciation is also extended to Stephen Smith for software and hardware development, Donna Neff for systems maintenance, and Sherry Sutphin and Glenda Clyde for manufacturing the pseudopal-ates.
Portions of this study were presented at the November 1992 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association held in San Antonio, Texas. Excerpts have also been reported in Dagenais (1992) .
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