Effects of Grammar Facilitation on the Phonological Performance of Children With Speech and Language Impairments Although there is a great deal of evidence for a significant developmental relationship between grammar and phonology, the nature of this relationship and its implications for the intervention of children with impairments in both grammar and phonology are unclear. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether two approaches ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1994
Effects of Grammar Facilitation on the Phonological Performance of Children With Speech and Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center Kansas City
  • Patricia L. Cleave
    University of Kansas Lawrence
  • Anna I. Ravida
    Board of Education for the City of Hamilton, Ontario
  • Steven H. Long
    Ithaca College Ithaca, NY
  • Amy E. Dejmal
    Mid-America Rehabilitation Hospital Overland Park, KS
  • Deborah L. Easton
    Easter Seal Society Dallas, TX
  • Contact author: Marc Fey, PhD, Department of Hearing and Speech, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160-7605. E-mail: fey@ukanvm
Article Information
Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1994
Effects of Grammar Facilitation on the Phonological Performance of Children With Speech and Language Impairments
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1994, Vol. 37, 594-607. doi:10.1044/jshr.3703.594
History: Received June 3, 1993 , Accepted December 1, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1994, Vol. 37, 594-607. doi:10.1044/jshr.3703.594
History: Received June 3, 1993; Accepted December 1, 1993

Although there is a great deal of evidence for a significant developmental relationship between grammar and phonology, the nature of this relationship and its implications for the intervention of children with impairments in both grammar and phonology are unclear. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether two approaches to grammar facilitation that placed no emphasis on phonology would have indirect effects on the phonological output of preschoolers with speech and language impairments. All 26 subjects, ages 44–70 months, had impairments both in grammar and in phonology. Ten subjects took part in a clinician-administered intervention program, eight subjects received a similar intervention program implemented by their parents, and eight children served as delayed intervention controls (Fey, Cleave, Long, & Hughes, 1993). The results indicated that despite a strong effect for the intervention on the children’s grammatical output, there were no indirect effects on the subjects’ phonological production. It is concluded that despite a close relationship between the development of grammar and phonology, language intervention approaches for children approximately 4 to 6 years of age should address phonological problems directly if significant effects on phonology are to be expected.

Acknowledgments
This study was presented in part at the 1992 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in San Antonio, TX. The research was sponsored by the Ministry of Community and Social Services, Ontario. This funding was administered by the Research and Program Evaluation Unit in cooperation with the Ontario Mental Health Foundation and was funded from the MCSS Research Grants Program awarded to M. E. Fey. We also gratefully acknowledge equipment contributions from the Ontario District Association of the Society for the Preservation of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America (the Barbershoppers). Able research assistance was provided by Kit Dench, Lynn Dupuis, Sarah Hawkins, David Loyst, Dan MacDougald, Chris Matthews, Cathy Moran, Sheila Murray, Anna Ravida, Brenda Ushiki, and Joanne Wickware.
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