Effect of High-Pass Filtering on the Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Response to Air- and Bone-Conducted Clicks The effect of standard high-pass analog filtering on the neonatal auditory brainstem response (ABR) to air- and bone-conducted clicks at low intensity screening levels was investigated. Simultaneous three channel recorded ABRs were obtained from 20 neonates with filter settings of 30–3000, 100–3000, and 150–3000 Hz at intensity levels of 20, ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 1994
Effect of High-Pass Filtering on the Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Response to Air- and Bone-Conducted Clicks
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrew Stuart
    Department of Psychology Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
  • Edward Y. Yang
    School of Human Communication Disorders Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
  • Contact author: Andrew Stuart, Department of Psychology Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   April 01, 1994
Effect of High-Pass Filtering on the Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Response to Air- and Bone-Conducted Clicks
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 475-479. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.475
History: Received February 19, 1993 , Accepted November 1, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 475-479. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.475
History: Received February 19, 1993; Accepted November 1, 1993

The effect of standard high-pass analog filtering on the neonatal auditory brainstem response (ABR) to air- and bone-conducted clicks at low intensity screening levels was investigated. Simultaneous three channel recorded ABRs were obtained from 20 neonates with filter settings of 30–3000, 100–3000, and 150–3000 Hz at intensity levels of 20, 30, and 40 dB nHL. Statistically significant reductions in wave V amplitude and decreases in wave V latency were observed for both transducers across all three low level stimulus intensities with the progressive increase in the high-pass filter cutoff (p < .05). These data support the advocacy of less restrictive high-pass filtering (e.g., 30 Hz) for neonatal and infant ABR screening to air- and bone-conducted clicks.

Acknowledgments
The authors greatly appreciate the assistance of Ms. Mihaela Botea in data analysis. The first author is supported by the Medical Research Council of Canada and the Killam Trusts, Dalhousie University. Paper presented in part at the 18th Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists, Charlottetown, PEI, May 5,1993.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access