Factors Associated With Individual Differences in Clinical Measures of Speech Recognition Among the Elderly In the present study, the speech-recognition performance of 50 subjects aged 63 to 83 years was measured for a wide range of materials (nonsense syllables, monosyllabic words, sentences) and listening conditions (presentation levels of 70 and 90 dB SPL, both in quiet and in a noise background). In addition to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Factors Associated With Individual Differences in Clinical Measures of Speech Recognition Among the Elderly
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Larry E. Humes
    Audiology Research Laboratory Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Betty U. Watson
    Audiology Research Laboratory Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Laurel A. Christensen
    Audiology Research Laboratory Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Carol G. Cokely
    Audiology Research Laboratory Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Dan C. Halling
    Audiology Research Laboratory Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Lidia Lee
    Audiology Research Laboratory Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Contact author: Larry E. Humes, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Factors Associated With Individual Differences in Clinical Measures of Speech Recognition Among the Elderly
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 465-474. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.465
History: Received February 25, 1993 , Accepted November 24, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 465-474. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.465
History: Received February 25, 1993; Accepted November 24, 1993

In the present study, the speech-recognition performance of 50 subjects aged 63 to 83 years was measured for a wide range of materials (nonsense syllables, monosyllabic words, sentences) and listening conditions (presentation levels of 70 and 90 dB SPL, both in quiet and in a noise background). In addition to complete audiologic evaluations, measures of auditory processing (the Test of Basic Auditory Capabilities [TBAC], Watson, 1987) and cognitive function (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised [WAIS-R], and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised [WMS-R], Wechsler, 1981, 1987) were obtained from all subjects. Principal component analyses were applied to each of the three sets of measures (speech-recognition, auditory, and cognitive) prior to examining associations among the sets using canonical analyses. Two principal components captured most of the systematic variation in performance sampled by the set of 20 speech-recognition measures. Hearing loss emerged as the single largest factor associated with individual differences in speech-recognition performance among the elderly, accounting for 70–75% of the total variance in speech-recognition performance, with the measures of auditory processing and cognitive function accounting for little or no additional variance.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported, in part, by a grant to the first author from the National Institute on Aging.
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