The Effect of Noise Spectrum on Speech Recognition Performance-Intensity Functions Articulation theory predicts that a subject’s absolute or masked threshold configuration will affect the slope of the speech recognition performance-intensity (P-I) function. This study was carried out to test that prediction. Performance-intensity functions for the Technisonic Studios W-22 recordings were obtained from 12 subjects with normal hearing. Four continuous thermal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
The Effect of Noise Spectrum on Speech Recognition Performance-Intensity Functions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerald A. Studebaker
    Memphis State University, TN
  • Rebecca Taylor
    Memphis State University, TN
  • Robert L. Sherbecoe
    Memphis State University, TN
  • Contact author: Gerald A. Studebaker, Memphis State University, Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
The Effect of Noise Spectrum on Speech Recognition Performance-Intensity Functions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 439-448. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.439
History: Received March 24, 1993 , Accepted November 11, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 439-448. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.439
History: Received March 24, 1993; Accepted November 11, 1993

Articulation theory predicts that a subject’s absolute or masked threshold configuration will affect the slope of the speech recognition performance-intensity (P-I) function. This study was carried out to test that prediction. Performance-intensity functions for the Technisonic Studios W-22 recordings were obtained from 12 subjects with normal hearing. Four continuous thermal noise maskers, high-pass (HP) noise, white noise, ANSI noise, and talker-spectrum-matched (TSM) noise, were used to shape threshold. P-I function slopes for the averaged data ranged from about 1.6%o/dB in HP noise to about 6.7%/dB in TSM noise. At low to moderate speech intensity levels, the positions and slopes of the P- functions were accurately estimated by an articulation index-type model that included corrections for subject proficiency and for high- and low-frequency spread of masking. At higher intensity levels, performance was overestimated by the model.

Acknowledgments
This paper is based on a doctoral dissertation by Rebecca Taylor (1991) . The authors wish to thank Christine Gilmore and Ginger Gray for their help in conducting the various follow-up studies, and Joseph Matesich for his help with instrumentation and software. Thanks are also extended to Charles E. Speaks and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful suggestions and insightful comments. This work was supported, in part, by grant DC00154 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access