Binaural Cues and Consonant Perception in Reverberation and Noise Although a binaural advantage for understanding speech in adverse listening conditions has long been recognized, little is known about how binaural hearing influences consonant error patterns. The goal of the present study was to examine differences in consonant perception when stimuli distorted by noise and/or reverberation were presented using monaural, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Binaural Cues and Consonant Perception in Reverberation and Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen S. Helfer
    University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Contact author: Karen S. Helfer, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 6 Arnold House, Amherst, MA 01003.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Binaural Cues and Consonant Perception in Reverberation and Noise
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 429-438. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.429
History: Received December 28, 1992 , Accepted November 23, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 429-438. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.429
History: Received December 28, 1992; Accepted November 23, 1993

Although a binaural advantage for understanding speech in adverse listening conditions has long been recognized, little is known about how binaural hearing influences consonant error patterns. The goal of the present study was to examine differences in consonant perception when stimuli distorted by noise and/or reverberation were presented using monaural, binaural, and diotic presentation modes. Results showed significant differences in error patterns among the three listening conditions (noise, reverberation, and reverberation + noise). Differences among the three presentation modes (monaural, binaural, and diotic) were subtle, as were interactions among presentation modes and listening conditions.

Acknowledgments
The author would like to thank Sandra Gordon-Salant, Chris Turner, Arlene Carney, and two anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments and suggestions on an earlier version of this article. Portions of this paper were presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in San Antonio, Texas, November 1992.
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