Masking Level Differences for Tones and Speech in Elderly Listeners With Relatively Normal Audiograms This study measured the masking level difference (MLD) for both 500-Hz tone detection and spondee word recognition in two groups of listeners. One group consisted of 9 elderly listeners with normal audiometric sensitivity bilaterally, up to at least 2000 Hz. The other group was a control group of 10 young ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Masking Level Differences for Tones and Speech in Elderly Listeners With Relatively Normal Audiograms
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John H. Grose
    University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
  • Elizabeth A. Poth
    Medical University of South Carolina Charleston
  • Robert W. Peters
    University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: John H. Grose, PhD, University of North Carolina, Division of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, Burnett-Womack Clinical Sciences Bldg., Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7070.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Masking Level Differences for Tones and Speech in Elderly Listeners With Relatively Normal Audiograms
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 422-428. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.422
History: Received March 23, 1993 , Accepted October 11, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 422-428. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.422
History: Received March 23, 1993; Accepted October 11, 1993

This study measured the masking level difference (MLD) for both 500-Hz tone detection and spondee word recognition in two groups of listeners. One group consisted of 9 elderly listeners with normal audiometric sensitivity bilaterally, up to at least 2000 Hz. The other group was a control group of 10 young listeners with normal hearing. The intent was to determine whether the elderly listeners exhibited a reduction in binaural performance that might contribute to the difficulties many such listeners have in understanding speech in noisy situations. By measuring MLDs in elderly listeners in the absence of marked peripheral hearing loss, it was hoped that any observed changes in MLD could be more strongly attributed to central effects. For both tone detection and speech recognition, it was found that the elderly performed more poorly than the young listeners, primarily on the NoSπ condition.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the NIDCD and is based on a master’s thesis submitted to the Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by the second author.
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