Speech Sample Size and Test-Retest Stability of Connected Speech Measures for Adults With Aphasia The effect of speech sample size on the test-retest stability of two measures of connected speech—words per minute (WPM) and percent of words that are correct information units (Percent CIUs)—was evaluated. A standard set of 10 stimuli was used to elicit connected speech from 20 non-brain-damaged adults and 20 adults ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Speech Sample Size and Test-Retest Stability of Connected Speech Measures for Adults With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert H. Brookshire
    Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Linda E. Nicholas
    Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Contact author: R. H. Brookshire, PhD, Speech Pathology (127A), VA Medical Center, 1 Veterans Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55417.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Speech Sample Size and Test-Retest Stability of Connected Speech Measures for Adults With Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 399-407. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.399
History: Received May 13, 1993 , Accepted November 2, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 399-407. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.399
History: Received May 13, 1993; Accepted November 2, 1993

The effect of speech sample size on the test-retest stability of two measures of connected speech—words per minute (WPM) and percent of words that are correct information units (Percent CIUs)—was evaluated. A standard set of 10 stimuli was used to elicit connected speech from 20 non-brain-damaged adults and 20 adults with aphasia. Each subject’s responses to the 10 stimuli were transcribed and scored for WPM and Percent CIUs. Then each subject’s responses to the 10 stimuli were randomly divided to produce smaller speech samples representing his or her responses to 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 stimuli. The test-retest stability of the WPM and Percent ClUs measures was then evaluated for each of the smaller sample sizes and for the complete 10-stimulus sample. For both groups, the test-retest stability of the two measures increased as sample size increased, with the greatest increases occurring as samples increased in size from those representing 1 stimulus to those representing 4 or 5 stimuli, with smaller increases in stability thereafter. In general, these results suggest that the best balance between high test-retest stability and the time and effort required to transcribe and score speech samples can be achieved with samples representing 4 or 5 stimuli (an average of 300 to 400 words for aphasic subjects), although this will vary across individuals.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Research Service, and by the Research Service, Minneapolis Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We want to thank Pat Poluha for her assistance with the design of the study and with data analysis.
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