Social Valence in Children With Specific Language Impairment During Imitation-Based and Conversation-Based Language Intervention This study investigated the level of social valence and type of social behaviors expressed in 15 children with specific language impairment as they engaged in typical language intervention activities during conversation-based and imitation-based language programs. These programs were both applied to each child over a period of several weeks. Videotapes ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Social Valence in Children With Specific Language Impairment During Imitation-Based and Conversation-Based Language Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katarina L. Haley
    Division of Hearing & Speech Sciences Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Stephen M. Camarata
    Division of Hearing & Speech Sciences Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Keith E. Nelson
    Department of Psychology Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA
  • Contact author: Stephen Camarata, PhD., Scottish Rite Child Language Disorders Center, Division of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Station 17, Box 552, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232.
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Social Valence in Children With Specific Language Impairment During Imitation-Based and Conversation-Based Language Intervention
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 378-388. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.378
History: Received December 16, 1992 , Accepted October 22, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 378-388. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.378
History: Received December 16, 1992; Accepted October 22, 1993

This study investigated the level of social valence and type of social behaviors expressed in 15 children with specific language impairment as they engaged in typical language intervention activities during conversation-based and imitation-based language programs. These programs were both applied to each child over a period of several weeks. Videotapes of treatment sessions were analyzed for the presence of five verbal and 11 nonverbal behaviors selected to measure social valence. In addition, the child’s level of social valence was scored on a three-point rating scale. The results showed that although both types of treatments were predominantly associated with positive social valence ratings and a high frequency of smiling, laughing, and engagement in the activities, a significantly higher number of these positive ratings and behaviors were noted within conversation-based treatment. In contrast, although negative social valence ratings and expressions of boredom or dislike were very rare, these were observed more frequently under imitation-based treatment. There was a significantly higher rate of verbal initiations in the conversation-based treatment, and a significantly higher rate of quiet, passive participation in the imitation-based treatment. The findings are discussed in relation to treatment selection and viable strategies for assessing treatment acceptability in children.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health, NIDCD, Research Grants NS-26437 and DC01420, and also by an endowment to the second author from the Scottish Rite Foundation of Nashville. We wish to thank Jeannie Bragg and Lisa Rosenblatt for their help with the data collection. Appreciation is also extended to Martin Fujiki, Ralph Ohde, Russell Love, Mindy Harmer, Carolyn Hughes, Holly Craig, and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments on earlier versions of this manuscript.
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