Ability of Institutionalized and Community-Based Adults With Retardation to Respond to Questions in an Interview Context This study examined the ability of adults with mild and moderate levels of retardation to respond to simple and complex questions. The sample consisted of 20 subjects living in an institutional setting and 20 subjects living in the community. A 30-minute language sample, structured as a job interview, was elicited ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Ability of Institutionalized and Community-Based Adults With Retardation to Respond to Questions in an Interview Context
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Contact author: Bonnie Brinton, PhD, Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology, Brigham Young University, P.O. Box 28663, Provo, UT 84602-8663. E-mail: brintonb@yvax.byu.edu
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Ability of Institutionalized and Community-Based Adults With Retardation to Respond to Questions in an Interview Context
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 369-377. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.369
History: Received January 19, 1993 , Accepted October 4, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 369-377. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.369
History: Received January 19, 1993; Accepted October 4, 1993

This study examined the ability of adults with mild and moderate levels of retardation to respond to simple and complex questions. The sample consisted of 20 subjects living in an institutional setting and 20 subjects living in the community. A 30-minute language sample, structured as a job interview, was elicited from each subject by an investigator. During the interview, the investigator asked a number of questions interspersed within the conversation. Two levels of questions were presented: simple and complex. Ten questions were presented at each level. Responses were scored in terms of how informative and truthful the subject was (specific scoring conventions were based upon the work of Grice, 1975). The community group produced a significantly greater number of appropriate answers to both simple and complex questions than did the institutional group. Group differences were observed along both parameters of informativeness and truthfulness.

Acknowledgments
This research was in part supported by Grant No. 33C90121 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitative Research, awarded to the University of Kansas, Bureau of Child Research, Parsons Research Center, Parsons, Kansas. We would like to thank Malcom McNeil, Howard Goldstein, and an anonymous reviewer for their helpful comments and suggestions.
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