Stuttering Modification and Changes in Phonation Observations on Findings From Recent Reports Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1994
Stuttering Modification and Changes in Phonation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Merrilyn L. Gow
    Teachers College Columbia University, New York
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1994
Stuttering Modification and Changes in Phonation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 343-345. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.343b
History: Received September 20, 1993 , Accepted November 16, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 343-345. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.343b
History: Received September 20, 1993; Accepted November 16, 1993
Since the early 1970s there has been interest in the role of certain speech production parameters within the effects of “fluency-inducing” and stuttering treatment procedures on stuttering. This interest appears to have stemmed from two sources: (a) Wingate’s (1969; 1970) provocative hypothesis that virtually all fluency-inducing procedures achieve their effects by inducing the speaker to emphasize vocalization; and (b) the dramatic growth of stuttering treatments based on
Goldiamond’s (1965)  prolonged-speech technique, which is characterized by relative increases in the proportion of phonation during speech (see Andrews, Howie, Dozsa, & Guitar, 1982; Goldiamond, 1965, Ingham, 1984, Ch. 4). It seems clear, though, that such changes in phonation are probably not common to all fluency-inducing procedures (Ingham, 1990), yet this has not diminished interest in determining whether there are critical changes in voicing or phonation that control stuttering. Despite that interest, few attempts to isolate the precise nature of such changes have proven successful. We offer some observations on some recent Journal of Speech and Hearing Research papers on this topic and suggest that part of the reason for the lack of clarity in the findings might reside in the use of descriptive rather than experimental research methods.
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