Reply to Martinez, Bedore, and Ludwig We are glad to see that Martinez, Bedore, and Ludwig take seriously the potential problems of cultural differences in communication disorders treatment and research, and we hope other readers were prompted by our article to think about such issues. We do believe, however, that some of the shortcomings Martinez et ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1994
Reply to Martinez, Bedore, and Ludwig
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Bebout
    University of Windsor
  • Bradford Arthur
    San Francisco State University
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1994
Reply to Martinez, Bedore, and Ludwig
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 343. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.343a
History: Accepted December 2, 1993 , Received December 2, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 343. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.343a
History: Accepted December 2, 1993; Received December 2, 1993
We are glad to see that Martinez, Bedore, and Ludwig take seriously the potential problems of cultural differences in communication disorders treatment and research, and we hope other readers were prompted by our article to think about such issues. We do believe, however, that some of the shortcomings Martinez et al. see in Bebout and Arthur (1992)  are due to their misunderstanding the purposes of the study.
We intended this study to be a preliminary, exploratory one that would show whether there were possible differences that should be investigated in future studies. Although we did look at previous related work and did conduct interviews to give us ideas for appropriate topics (Bebout & Arthur, 1992, p. 46), we did not want to narrow the focus of the questionnaire so much that it was biased in favor of some cultural groups and away from others to which members of our initial subject pool might belong. We have now begun the narrowing process by working closely with bilingual native speakers of two languages, Cantonese and Spanish, to produce versions of the questionnaire in those languages for administration to North American residents who indicate that they feel more comfortable responding to a questionnaire in their first language (L1). The L1 questionnaires are being administered by bilingual research assistants who can answer questions in the L1.
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