On Cultural Sensitivity in Assessing Cross-Cultural Attitudes Comments on Bebout and Arthur (1992) Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1994
On Cultural Sensitivity in Assessing Cross-Cultural Attitudes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alfonso Martinez
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Lisa M. Bedore
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Jennifer L. Ludwig
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1994
On Cultural Sensitivity in Assessing Cross-Cultural Attitudes
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 341-342. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.341
History: Received June 17, 1993 , Accepted October 15, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 341-342. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.341
History: Received June 17, 1993; Accepted October 15, 1993
On Cultural Sensitivity in Assessing Cross-Cultural Attitudes: Comments on Bebout and Arthur (1992) 
The purpose of this letter is to comment on Bebout and Arthur’s (1992)  article on cross-cultural attitudes toward speech disorders. These researchers sought to investigate cross-cultural attitudes toward “severe adult stuttering, speech of the hearing impaired, cleft palate, and (Disarticulating older children” (p. 46). Their sample consisted of students taking English classes at a U.S. or Canadian university, or courses at an ESL (English as a second language) institute. They grouped subjects into six geographical-origin groups: United States/Canada; Hong Kong/Singapore/Malaysia/Taiwan; Southeast Asia; People’s Republic of China; Japan; and Latin America. For other analyses, they constructed five native language groups or compared North American and foreign-born subjects. Although we believe this topic merits empirical investigation, the subject sample and research design seemed inadequate for this purpose. Moreover, we believe that the study was conducted without due consideration for multicultural issues. Our focus here will be to point out the shortcomings we identified and to make suggestions that could make future research more culturally sensitive and, ultimately, more valid for addressing this topic. Comments and suggestions will be organized around the following: development and administration of the questionnaire, data analysis, interpretation of the results, and future directions for conducting cross-cultural research.
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