Stutterers’ Self-Ratings of How Natural Speech Sounds and Feels The efficacy of stuttering treatment has been a contentious issue in recent years. Two issues of primary concern include the treated stutterer’s abnormal speech quality and the problem of continually self-monitoring fluency skills. One approach to addressing these issues is to obtain stutterers’ self-ratings of speech quality and levels of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Stutterers’ Self-Ratings of How Natural Speech Sounds and Feels
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patrick Finn
    University of New Mexico Albuquerque
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Patrick Finn, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of New Mexico, 901 Vassar NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1191.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Stutterers’ Self-Ratings of How Natural Speech Sounds and Feels
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 326-340. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.326
History: Received May 26, 1993 , Accepted November 16, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 326-340. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.326
History: Received May 26, 1993; Accepted November 16, 1993

The efficacy of stuttering treatment has been a contentious issue in recent years. Two issues of primary concern include the treated stutterer’s abnormal speech quality and the problem of continually self-monitoring fluency skills. One approach to addressing these issues is to obtain stutterers’ self-ratings of speech quality and levels of speech monitoring. However, the reliability and validity of such self-ratings need to be assessed before they are suitable for use in stuttering treatment. The present study investigated one method of estimating the reliability and validity of stutterers’ self-ratings of how natural their speech sounds (speech naturalness), and how natural they feel about the amount of attention they are paying to the way they are speaking (feel naturalness). Twelve adult stutterers were instructed to self-rate the speech and feel naturalness of their speech under a variety of rhythmic stimulation conditions across repeated rating occasions. With some qualifications, the results showed that stutterers were relatively consistent and valid self-raters of speech quality and levels of speech monitoring.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank the students and staff who served as judges for this study: Richard Moglia who provided invaluable technical support, Peter Frank for statistical support and computer software design, and Tom Haring, PhD, for thoughtful advice and support. Portions of this article are based on a doctoral dissertation completed at the University of California, Santa Barbara, by Patrick Finn, under the supervision of Roger Ingham. Partial results were presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 1991, and supported by grant #DC00060-01A1 awarded to the second author by the National Institutes of Health.
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