Age and Velopharyngeal Function During Speech Production This investigation was designed to determine if velopharyngeal function during speech production, as reflected in measures of nasal air flow, differs with age in adults. Eighty subjects were studied, 40 women and 40 men, representing four age groups (20–30, 40–50, 60–70, and 80+ years). Results showed no age-related differences in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Age and Velopharyngeal Function During Speech Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Arizona Tucson
  • Peter J. Watson
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Arizona Tucson
  • Kimberly E. Hixon
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Arizona Tucson
  • Patricia McMahon
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Arizona Tucson
  • Cynthia L. Johnson
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Arizona Tucson
  • Contact author: Jeannette D. Hoit, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Age and Velopharyngeal Function During Speech Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 295-302. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.295
History: Received May 5, 1993 , Accepted September 28, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 295-302. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.295
History: Received May 5, 1993; Accepted September 28, 1993

This investigation was designed to determine if velopharyngeal function during speech production, as reflected in measures of nasal air flow, differs with age in adults. Eighty subjects were studied, 40 women and 40 men, representing four age groups (20–30, 40–50, 60–70, and 80+ years). Results showed no age-related differences in nasal air flow. Sex-related differences in flow were found on productions of nasal consonants only. These findings do not support the suggestion of Hutchinson, Robinson, and Nerbonne (1978)  that velopharyngeal function deteriorates with age.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Clinical Investigator Development Award DC-00030, Research Grant DC-00281, and National Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors gratefully acknowledge the conceptual contributions of Thomas J. Hixon and Lucrezia A. Tomes.
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