The Reliability of Observational Data II. Issues in the Identification and Measurement of Stuttering Events Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
The Reliability of Observational Data
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-7050.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
The Reliability of Observational Data
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 279-294. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.279
History: Received March 20, 1993 , Accepted October 29, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 279-294. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.279
History: Received March 20, 1993; Accepted October 29, 1993

Much attention has been directed recently toward the problem of measuring occurrences of stuttering with satisfactory levels of interjudge agreement. This paper reviews the prominent concepts of the stuttering event, arguing that they may be one cause of the stuttering measurement problem. The evidence that has led to concerns about the reliability of stuttering event measurements is also reviewed. Reliability and measurement issues that were discussed in the first paper of this series (Cordes, 1994) emerge as basic to the interpretation of much stuttering research, and it is argued that the stuttering measurement problem is not confined to research on stuttering judgments but actually permeates other important stuttering research areas. Some recent attempts to resolve the stuttering measurement problem are reviewed, and the implications of developing an improved measurement system for this disorder are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Authorship of this paper is equal. We express our appreciation to Marilyn Demorest and Martin Young for their reviews of this manuscript. Preparation of this manuscript was supported by grant #DC00060, awarded to R. J. Ingham by the National Institutes of Health.
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