Duration of Sound Prolongation and Sound/Syllable Repetition in Children Who Stutter Preliminary Observations Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Duration of Sound Prolongation and Sound/Syllable Repetition in Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia M. Zebrowski
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Contact author: Patricia M. Zebrowski, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, 127 WJSHC, Iowa City, Iowa 52245.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Duration of Sound Prolongation and Sound/Syllable Repetition in Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 254-263. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.254
History: Received June 17, 1993 , Accepted October 15, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 254-263. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.254
History: Received June 17, 1993; Accepted October 15, 1993

The purpose of this study was to measure the duration of sound prolongations and sound/syllable repetitions (stutterings) in the conversational speech of school-age children who stutter. The relationships between duration and (a) frequency and type of speech disfluency, (b) number and rate of repeated units per instance of sound/syllable repetition, (c) overall speech rate, and (d) articulatory rate were also examined. Results indicated that for the children in this study the average duration of stuttering was approximately three-quarters of a second, and was not significantly correlated with age, length of post-onset interval, or frequency of speech disfluency. In addition, findings can be taken to suggest that part of the clinical significance of stuttering duration for children who stutter might lie in its relationship to the amount of sound prolongations these children produce, as well as their articulatory rate during fluent speech.

Acknowledgments
Thank you to all the children and parents who participated in this study. A special thanks to Lisa Raszkowski for her assistance in data analysis. Appreciation is extended to Janis Costello Ingham, Donald Robin, J. Bruce Tomblin, and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments on earlier versions of this manuscript.
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