Effects of Temporal Alterations on Speech Intelligibility in Parkinsonian Dysarthria The effect of two types of temporal alterations, paced and synthetic, on the intelligibility of parkinsonian dysarthric speech was investigated. Six speakers with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease served as subjects. Paced temporal alterations were created by slowing each speaker to 60% of his/her habitual speaking rate. The synthetic alterations were created ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Effects of Temporal Alterations on Speech Intelligibility in Parkinsonian Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vicki L. Hammen
    Audiology and Speech Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Kathryn M. Yorkston
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine University of Washington, Seattle
  • Fred D. Minifie
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Washington, Seattle
  • Contact author: Vicki L. Hammen, PhD, Audiology and Speech Sciences, 1353 Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Effects of Temporal Alterations on Speech Intelligibility in Parkinsonian Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 244-253. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.244
History: Received January 28, 1992 , Accepted August 30, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 244-253. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.244
History: Received January 28, 1992; Accepted August 30, 1993

The effect of two types of temporal alterations, paced and synthetic, on the intelligibility of parkinsonian dysarthric speech was investigated. Six speakers with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease served as subjects. Paced temporal alterations were created by slowing each speaker to 60% of his/her habitual speaking rate. The synthetic alterations were created by modifying the habitual rate speech samples using digital signal processing. Three types of synthetic alterations were examined: Pause Altered, Speech Duration Altered, and Pause and Speech Duration Altered. The 60% of habitual speaking rate condition was more intelligible than the synthetic conditions. In addition, none of the synthetic alterations were found to be more intelligible than samples produced at habitual speaking rates. The results suggest that simple alterations of speech signals do not explain the differences in intelligibility that have been observed when parkinsonian dysarthric speakers reduce speaking rates. Reasons for the failure of synthetic alterations to increase speech intelligibility scores are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by Grant #H133B80081 from the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Department of Education, Washington D.C., and a graduate student scholarship from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation to the first author. Grateful thanks to Ed Belcher who wrote some of the programs used in this study. The authors would also like to thank Carol Stoel-Gammon, Harry Cooker, Marjorie Anderson and Michael McClean for their input regarding this research. James Hillenbrand and three anonymous reviewers provided helpful suggestions during the preparation of this manuscript.
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