Auditory Lexical Decisions in Children and Adults An Examination of Response Factors Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1993
Auditory Lexical Decisions in Children and Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan Edwards
    Hunter College, CUNY New York
  • Margaret Lahey
    Emerson College Boston, MA
  • Contact author: Jan Edwards, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, 110 Pressey Hall, 1070 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • Currently affiliated with Ohio State University, Columbus.
    Currently affiliated with Ohio State University, Columbus.×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1993
Auditory Lexical Decisions in Children and Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 996-1003. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.996
History: Received October 13, 1992 , Accepted April 16, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 996-1003. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.996
History: Received October 13, 1992; Accepted April 16, 1993

This study examined the influence of nonlexical response factors on the speed of auditory lexical decisions in children and adults. Two groups of children (6- and 7-year-olds, 8- and 9-year-olds) and adults participated in three tasks: a real-word lexical decision task in which subjects were asked to say "yes" as quickly as possible to real words; a nonword lexical decision task in which subjects were asked to say "no" as quickly as possible to nonwords; and an auditory-vocal reaction time task in which subjects were asked to say "yes" or "no" to a tone. Response times on all tasks decreased with age. However, the age-related differences on the real-word lexical decision task disappeared when differences in auditory-vocal reaction times were taken into account. This result suggests that a large part of developmental differences in the speed of lexical processing may be due to nonlexical response factors.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by NIDCD grant number DC00676 to Margaret Lahey and Jan Edwards; by PSC-CUNY grant number 669476 to Jan Edwards; by Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Grant number 12-256 from the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation to Margaret Lahey; and by a grant from The Institutes of Communication Studies at Emerson College to Margaret Lahey. We would like to thank Janet Addams, Suzanne Boyce, Aviva R. Ramras, and Lynne Rosenbloom for help in data collection; Beatrice Krauss for help with the statistical analysis; and Philip Enny for the computer programs. We also thank Marios Fourakis for comments on an earlier version of this paper.
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