Conversations With Children Who Are Language Impaired Asking Questions Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1993
Conversations With Children Who Are Language Impaired
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith R. Johnston
    University of British Columbia Vancouver, B.C.
  • Jon F. Miller
    University of Wisconsin at Madison
  • Susan Curtiss
    University of California at Los Angeles
  • Paula Tallal
    RutUniversity at Newark RewarNutgers NJ
  • Contact author: Judith R. Johnston, School of Audiology and Speech Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z3. E-mail: (Bitnet) userjujo@ubcmtsg
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1993
Conversations With Children Who Are Language Impaired
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 973-978. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.973
History: Accepted April 13, 1992 , Received November 13, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 973-978. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.973
History: Accepted April 13, 1992; Received November 13, 1992

Samples of conversational language were elicited with a standardized interview protocol from 24 children, aged 2:6 to 7:8, half with specific language impairment (SLI), half with normally developing language (LN), matched for language level. Samples were analyzed to determine whether there were associations between adult questioning and children’s use of ellipsis. For the SLI children, but not the LN children, increased proportions of questions were significantly correlated to increased proportions of ellipsis. This finding has implications for the use of MLU measures in clinical and research practice.

Acknowledgments
Data collection for this study was supported by NIH NINCDS contract #NIH N01NS92322 to Tallal and Curtiss. Preparation of the transcripts and data analysis was supported by NIH grant #R01NS26517-1 to Johnston and Miller. The authors wish to thank Carmen Parsons for her expert assistance in analysis of the transcripts.
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