The Relationship Between Speech-Language Impairments and Reading Disabilities A group of children with speech-language impairments was identified in kindergarten and given a battery of speech-language tests and measures of phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming. Subjects were followed in first and second grades and administered tests of written word recognition and reading comprehension. The children with speech-language impairments ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 1993
The Relationship Between Speech-Language Impairments and Reading Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hugh W. Catts
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Contact author: Hugh W. Catts, PhD, The University of Kansas, Speech-Language-Hearing, 3031 Dole, Lawrence, KS 66045-2181.
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 1993
The Relationship Between Speech-Language Impairments and Reading Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 948-958. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.948
History: Received August 5, 1992 , Accepted March 9, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 948-958. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.948
History: Received August 5, 1992; Accepted March 9, 1993

A group of children with speech-language impairments was identified in kindergarten and given a battery of speech-language tests and measures of phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming. Subjects were followed in first and second grades and administered tests of written word recognition and reading comprehension. The children with speech-language impairments were found to perform less well on reading tests than a nonimpaired comparison group. Subjects’ performance on standardized measures of language ability in kindergarten was observed to be closely related to reading outcome, especially reading comprehension. Measures of phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming, on the other hand, were found to be the best predictors of written word recognition. The implications of these findings for the early identification and remediation of reading disabilities are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Department of Education (H024U8001). The author would like to thank the administrators, speech-language pathologists, teachers, and children who participated in this project. Much appreciation is also expressed to Linda Swank, Chieh-Fang Hu, Linda Larrivee, Laurie Stewart, Amy Larsen, Shaunna Mcintosh, Karen Wiggins, Melissa Thomas, Mary Brown, and Janet Marquis for their assistance in data collection and analysis.
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