The Need for Replication Replication provides verification and disconfirmation functions for the scholarly fields. Relatively few replications were found in a survey of studies in JSHD and JSHR over a recent decade. Based on the probabilities of Type I and Type II errors, there are likely to be approximately 50 to 250 false findings ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 1993
The Need for Replication
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John R. Muma
    University of Alberta Edmonton, Canada
  • Contact author: John R. Muma, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Corbett Hall, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2G4.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   October 01, 1993
The Need for Replication
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 927-930. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.927
History: Received November 20, 1992 , Accepted May 13, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 927-930. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.927
History: Received November 20, 1992; Accepted May 13, 1993

Replication provides verification and disconfirmation functions for the scholarly fields. Relatively few replications were found in a survey of studies in JSHD and JSHR over a recent decade. Based on the probabilities of Type I and Type II errors, there are likely to be approximately 50 to 250 false findings in this literature. Because many studies had relatively small sample sizes, replication would be helpful for extending the generalization of their results. These data underscore the urgency for more replications in the field.

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