Coexistence of Stuttering and Disordered Phonology in Young Children The purpose of the present study was to assess differences in stuttering, phonological, and diadochokinetic behaviors in young children who exhibit both stuttering and disordered phonology and children who exhibit only one of the disorders. Subjects were 21 male children (aged 4 to 6 years), representing three groups of seven ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1993
Coexistence of Stuttering and Disordered Phonology in Young Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lesley Wolk
    University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Mary Louise Edwards
    Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
  • Edward G. Conture
    Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
  • Contact author: Lesley Wolk, PhD, Dept. of Communication Sciences, Box U-85,850 Botton Road, University of Connecticut, Storrs CT 06269-1085.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1993
Coexistence of Stuttering and Disordered Phonology in Young Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 906-917. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.906
History: Received March 24, 1992 , Accepted April 1, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 906-917. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.906
History: Received March 24, 1992; Accepted April 1, 1993

The purpose of the present study was to assess differences in stuttering, phonological, and diadochokinetic behaviors in young children who exhibit both stuttering and disordered phonology and children who exhibit only one of the disorders. Subjects were 21 male children (aged 4 to 6 years), representing three groups of seven children each: (a) stuttering and normal phonological abilities (S+NP), (b) stuttering and disordered phonology (S+DP), and (c) normal fluency and disordered phonology (NF+DP). Stuttering behavior was assessed during a 30-minute conversational speech task; phonological behavior was assessed during a 162 item picture-naming task; and diadochokinetic abilities were assessed during bi- and multisyllable productions. Results indicated that the S+DP group produced significantly more sound prolongations and significantly fewer iterations per whole-word repetition than the S+NP group. However, there were no differences between the two groups in other stuttering indices. Moreover, no differences were noted between the S+DP and NF+DP groups in phonological behavior. Diadochokinetic rates did not differ among the three groups. The possibility of two types of stuttering, one occurring with and one without disordered phonology, is discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by OSEP (H023C80008) and NIH (DC00523) research grants to Syracuse University, and by a grant from the Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, South Africa, awarded to the first author. Special thanks to Jim Chan, Lisa LaSalle, Linda Louko, Andrew Meisler, and John Saxman for their various contributions to this project.
This study is based on the first author’s dissertation completed at Syracuse University under the supervision of Edward G. Conture and Mary Louise Edwards.
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