Event-Related Brain Potentials Preceding Speech and Nonspeech Oral Movements of Varying Complexity Cortical preparation for movement is reflected in the readiness potential (RP) waveform preceding voluntary limb movements. In the case of oral movements, the RP may be affected by the complexity or linguistic nature of the tasks. In this experiment, EEG potentials before a nonspeech task (lip pursing), a speech-like task ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1993
Event-Related Brain Potentials Preceding Speech and Nonspeech Oral Movements of Varying Complexity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy B. Wohlert
    Division of Speech and Hearing Science The Ohio State University Columbus
  • Contact author: Amy B. Wohlert, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, 1353 Heavilon Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1353. E-mail: wohlert@sage.cc.purdue.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1993
Event-Related Brain Potentials Preceding Speech and Nonspeech Oral Movements of Varying Complexity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 897-905. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.897
History: Received November 10, 1992 , Accepted April 1, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 897-905. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.897
History: Received November 10, 1992; Accepted April 1, 1993

Cortical preparation for movement is reflected in the readiness potential (RP) waveform preceding voluntary limb movements. In the case of oral movements, the RP may be affected by the complexity or linguistic nature of the tasks. In this experiment, EEG potentials before a nonspeech task (lip pursing), a speech-like task (lip rounding), and single word production were recorded from scalp electrodes placed at the cranial vertex (Cz) and over the left and right motor strips (C3′ and C4′). Seven right-handed female subjects produced at least 70 repetitions of the three tasks, in each of five repeated sessions. EEG records were averaged with respect to EMG onset at the lip.

The word task, as opposed to the other tasks, was associated with greater negative amplitude in the RP waveform at the vertex site. Differences between the waveforms recorded at the rightand left-hemisphere sites were insignificant. Although intersubject variability was high, individuals had relatively stable patterns of response across sessions. Results suggest that the RP recorded at the vertex site is sensitive to changes in task complexity. The RP did not reflect lateralized activity indicative of hemispheric dominance.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by Seed Grant 22139, The Ohio State University. The author wishes to thank Polly Stewart for her help in gathering the data, and Anne Smith, Erich Luschei, and an anonymous reviewer for insightful comments on various drafts of the manuscript.
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