Intelligibility of Selected Passages From the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) Test Two experiments were conducted to examine the intelligibility of 12 of the 72 passages of connected discourse prepared by Cox and McDaniel (1984, 1989) in the development of the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) test. Intelligibility was assessed with a method-of-adjustment procedure in the presence of two maskers. One was a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1993
Intelligibility of Selected Passages From the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) Test
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William G. Beck
    Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Aurora, CO
  • Charles Speaks
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Charles E. Speaks, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1993
Intelligibility of Selected Passages From the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) Test
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 1075-1082. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.1075
History: Received November 9, 1992 , Accepted April 5, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 1075-1082. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.1075
History: Received November 9, 1992; Accepted April 5, 1993

Two experiments were conducted to examine the intelligibility of 12 of the 72 passages of connected discourse prepared by Cox and McDaniel (1984, 1989) in the development of the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) test. Intelligibility was assessed with a method-of-adjustment procedure in the presence of two maskers. One was a multi-talker babble with a variable S/N ratio environment that yields intelligibility scores that are potentially level-dependent because of the almost inevitable difference in speech intensity from passage to passage. The second was a signal-correlated noise with a constant S/N ratio environment that provides scores that are essentially level-independent. Two homogeneous subsets of nine passages each were identified that yield equivalent intelligibility scores. The outcome underscores the value of incorporating a signal-correlated noise masker that yields scores that are relatively unaffected by small differences in signal level among passages.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NINCD grant DC00110 and the Bryng Bryngelson Communication Disorders Research Fund. We express our appreciation to Robyn Cox, Dianne Van Tasell, Tom Crain, Nancy Niccum, Tim Trine, and two reviewers for their helpful comments on an earlier version of the manuscript. All subjects studied in this investigation provided written informed consent prior to their participation. The opinions and assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.
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