The Efficacy of Using the IBM Speech Viewer Vowel Accuracy Module to Treat Young Children With Hearing Impairment The efficacy of the IBM SpeechViewer’s Vowel Accuracy Module for the treatment of vowel productions was evaluated in six preschool children with hearing-impairment over a 4-month period. A single-subject design was used, and the vowels /a/, /i/ and /u/ were treated. Untreated sounds also were probed to monitor for carryover ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1993
The Efficacy of Using the IBM Speech Viewer Vowel Accuracy Module to Treat Young Children With Hearing Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sheila R. Pratt
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Anne T. Heintzelman
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Susan Ensrud Deming
    Madison Metropolitan School District Madison, WI
  • Contact author: Sheila Pratt, PhD, Department of Communication, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.
  • Currently affiliated with the Department of Communication, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
    Currently affiliated with the Department of Communication, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1993
The Efficacy of Using the IBM Speech Viewer Vowel Accuracy Module to Treat Young Children With Hearing Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 1063-1074. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.1063
History: Received August 3, 1992 , Accepted March 29, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 1063-1074. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.1063
History: Received August 3, 1992; Accepted March 29, 1993

The efficacy of the IBM SpeechViewer’s Vowel Accuracy Module for the treatment of vowel productions was evaluated in six preschool children with hearing-impairment over a 4-month period. A single-subject design was used, and the vowels /a/, /i/ and /u/ were treated. Untreated sounds also were probed to monitor for carryover and developmental effects. One of the children was dismissed from the study because of noncompliance. Of the remaining five children, four exhibited a treatment effect for /u/, two for /a/, and one for /i/. Four of the children demonstrated some generalization. Developmental effects, as represented by change in /s/-cluster production, were not documented. Although treatment effects were observed, difficulties with the Vowel Accuracy Module were also observed. These included inaccuracies in the feedback on low-intensity, hypemasal, and high-pitched utterances; inability to sustain the attention of preschoolers over multiple sessions; lack of instructional feedback; and nonlinearity in the criterion-adjustment control.

Acknowledgments
We wish to express our appreciation to Witt Anderson, Mary Nellis, and the Madison Metropolitan School District for providing us with space as well as access to the children treated in the study. We also would like to thank Malcolm McNeil, Terry Wiley, Judine Wiken-heiser, and all of the independent judges for their time, contributions, and comments.
This work was supported by a Special Needs Technology Grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation in conjunction with the IBM Corporation.
Portions of this work were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in Seattle, 1990.
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