History of Middle Ear Involvement and Speech/Language Development in Late Talkers Late-talking and normally speaking toddlers with and without histories of middle ear involvement were followed for 2 years to assess speech and expressive language outcomes. Results revealed no differences in expressive language outcome that could be attributed to history of middle ear involvement in either group. There did seem to ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 1993
History of Middle Ear Involvement and Speech/Language Development in Late Talkers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rhea Paul
    Portland State University Portland, OR
  • Timothy F. Lynn
    Groner School District Hillsboro, OR
  • Marla Lohr-Flanders
    Arkansas Health Department Little Rock, AR
  • Contact author: Rhea Paul, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207. E-mail: (Bitnet) HURP@PSUORVM
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Language Disorders / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 1993
History of Middle Ear Involvement and Speech/Language Development in Late Talkers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 1055-1062. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.1055
History: Received March 27, 1992 , Accepted May 11, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1993, Vol. 36, 1055-1062. doi:10.1044/jshr.3605.1055
History: Received March 27, 1992; Accepted May 11, 1993

Late-talking and normally speaking toddlers with and without histories of middle ear involvement were followed for 2 years to assess speech and expressive language outcomes. Results revealed no differences in expressive language outcome that could be attributed to history of middle ear involvement in either group. There did seem to be differences in outcome on measures of articulation that were associated with history of middle ear involvement. The implications of these findings for treatment of otitis media and for referral of late-talking toddlers for speech and language services are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research has been supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (PHS grant number DC00793), the Meyer Memorial Trust, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, and Portland State University.
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