Auditory Perception, Phonological Processing, and Reading Ability/Disability Auditory perception has been proposed as one source of individual variation in the phonological abilities that play a critical role in skilled reading as well as in reading disabilities. A structural equation approach (LISREL, Jöreskog & Sörbom, 1990) was used to analyze relationships among auditory perception, phonological processing, and reading ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 1993
Auditory Perception, Phonological Processing, and Reading Ability/Disability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Betty U. Watson
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Theodore K. Miller
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Contact author: Betty U. Watson, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 1993
Auditory Perception, Phonological Processing, and Reading Ability/Disability
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 850-863. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.850
History: Received July 29, 1992 , Accepted March 29, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 850-863. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.850
History: Received July 29, 1992; Accepted March 29, 1993

Auditory perception has been proposed as one source of individual variation in the phonological abilities that play a critical role in skilled reading as well as in reading disabilities. A structural equation approach (LISREL, Jöreskog & Sörbom, 1990) was used to analyze relationships among auditory perception, phonological processing, and reading in a sample of 94 college undergraduates, 24 of whom met specific criteria for a reading disability. In the mathematical model that proved to be the best fit to the data, speech perception was strongly related to three of four phonological variables including short- and long-term auditory memory and phoneme segmentation. These phonological variables in turn were strongly related to reading. Nonverbal temporal processing was not significantly related to any of the phonological variables in the structural equations. It was concluded that speech perception, which was measured with speech repetition, syllable sequence discrimination, and degraded speech tasks, may contribute significantly to individual differences in the phonological abilities necessary for skilled reading.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by grant DC00250 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors express their sincere thanks to Shelley Ross for her invaluable assistance in collecting the data for this study, to Ted Bell for his generous help with the Posner tasks, and to Charles S. Watson for his many helpful suggestions throughout the course of the study.
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