Developmental Patterns of Duration Discrimination The purpose of this study was to determine whether the auditory perceptual abilities of children are characterized by an age-related improvement in duration discrimination. Forty children, ages 4 to 10 years, and 10 adults served as subjects. Difference limens were obtained using a 350-msec broadband noise burst as the standard ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1993
Developmental Patterns of Duration Discrimination
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill L. Elfenbein
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Arnold M. Small
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Julia M. Davis
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Jill L. Elfenbein, PhD, 125 Speech and Hearing Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1993
Developmental Patterns of Duration Discrimination
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 842-849. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.842
History: Received September 21, 1992 , Accepted March 25, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 842-849. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.842
History: Received September 21, 1992; Accepted March 25, 1993

The purpose of this study was to determine whether the auditory perceptual abilities of children are characterized by an age-related improvement in duration discrimination. Forty children, ages 4 to 10 years, and 10 adults served as subjects. Difference limens were obtained using a 350-msec broadband noise burst as the standard stimulus in a three-interval forcedchoice paradigm. Data were characterized by significant differences between the performances of the 4-, 6-, and 8-year-olds and those of the adults. Acquisition of adult-like discrimination performance was demonstrated between the ages of 8 and 10 years.

Acknowledgments
The results of this study were presented in November 1986 at the American Speech and Hearing Association Convention, Detroit, Michigan.
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