Effects of Word Predictability, Child Development, and Aging on Time-Gated Speech Recognition Performance This study examined the interaction of acoustic-phonetic information with higher-level linguistic contextual information during the real-time speech perception process in child, young adult, and older adult listeners. Five age groups were studied: (a) young children ranging in age from 5 to 7 years, (b) older children aged 8 to 10 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1993
Effects of Word Predictability, Child Development, and Aging on Time-Gated Speech Recognition Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chie H. Craig
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Byoung W. Kim
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Paula M. Pecyna Rhyner
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Tricia K. Bowen Chirillo
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Contact author: Chie H. Craig, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Milwaukee, Enderis Hall, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201.
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1993
Effects of Word Predictability, Child Development, and Aging on Time-Gated Speech Recognition Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 832-841. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.832
History: Received July 10, 1992 , Accepted March 9, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 832-841. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.832
History: Received July 10, 1992; Accepted March 9, 1993

This study examined the interaction of acoustic-phonetic information with higher-level linguistic contextual information during the real-time speech perception process in child, young adult, and older adult listeners. Five age groups were studied: (a) young children ranging in age from 5 to 7 years, (b) older children aged 8 to 10 years, (c) young adults aged 18 to 23 years, (d) older adults aged 60 to 69 years, and (e) older adults aged 70 to 83 years. All subjects were presented with time-gated monosyllabic target words presented in sentence contexts containing contrasting levels of word predictability. Findings indicated that target word predictability influenced the timing and nature of the real-time recognition process including the listeners’ use of initial word sounds. Predictability-high (PH) words were recognized earlier and with greater confidence than predictability-low (PL) words. PH recognition performance was more influenced by child development and aging than PL recognition performance. Older adult listeners required more PH-gated word stimuli to produce accurate responses than younger adults. Older children showed more effective use of PH contexts than younger children.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (NIDCD) through an Academic Research Enhancement Award (HAR 1 R15 NS26017-01) and a Clinical Investigator Development Award (1 KOS DC00003-01 ). The authors acknowledge Alisa Suttner and Cheryl Hirl for their project assistance and Darryl Craig for his contributions to the data tabulation and statistical analyses.
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