Relationships Between Acoustically Determined Knowledge of Stop Place and Voicing Contrasts and Phonological Treatment Progress The speech of 7 children with phonological disorders (4 who failed to produce an initial voicing contrast for stops and 3 who failed to produce the alveolar-velar stop contrast) was analyzed for imperceptible acoustic distinctions for seemingly homophonous word pairs. Subjects were audio/video recorded before and during treatment as they ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1993
Relationships Between Acoustically Determined Knowledge of Stop Place and Voicing Contrasts and Phonological Treatment Progress
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann A. Tyler
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • G. Randall Figurski
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • Teru Langsdale
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • Contact author: Ann A. Tyler, PhD, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, Nell J. Redfield Building, Reno, NV 89557-0046. E-mail: atyler@unssun.nevada.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1993
Relationships Between Acoustically Determined Knowledge of Stop Place and Voicing Contrasts and Phonological Treatment Progress
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 746-759. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.746
History: Received July 17, 1992 , Accepted March 9, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 746-759. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.746
History: Received July 17, 1992; Accepted March 9, 1993

The speech of 7 children with phonological disorders (4 who failed to produce an initial voicing contrast for stops and 3 who failed to produce the alveolar-velar stop contrast) was analyzed for imperceptible acoustic distinctions for seemingly homophonous word pairs. Subjects were audio/video recorded before and during treatment as they produced minimal pairs containing their error and correct sounds. Acoustic measures were VOT and CV locus equations. The presence of acoustic distinctions was taken as evidence for productive knowledge of the sound contrasts. Treatment was applied experimentally and progress was related to pretreatment productive knowledge inferred from acoustic distinctions. A shorter treatment period was observed for subjects attributed to have productive knowledge of the contrast being trained, as compared with those who had no knowledge. One of the 4 subjects with initial voicing errors produced an acoustic distinction between voiced and voiceless stops and required the shortest treatment period to establish the voicing contrast. Two of 3 subjects with velar fronting displayed coarticulatory characteristics of velars and required fewer treatment sessions in comparison with the subject with no such characteristics. Results are discussed in reference to other linguistic and nonlinguistic variables from which to predict treatment outcomes.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a General Faculty Research Award to the first author from the University of Nevada Research Advisory Board. Portions of these data were presented at the 1991 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, Atlanta, Georgia, and the 1992 Convention, in San Antonio, Texas. The authors wish to thank John H. Saxman, Michael P. Robb, and an anonymous reviewer for helpful reviews of this manuscript at various stages.
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