Syllabic Timing in Dysarthria A new, intensity-based method of measuring syllable duration was used to assess syllabic timing in 75 patients with dysarthria of predominantly traumatic and cerebro-vascular origin and in 30 normal subjects. The applied speech tasks included repetitions of sentences containing chains of plosive-vowel-syllables. The logarithm of the duration of the syllable ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1993
Syllabic Timing in Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wolfram Ziegler
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group City Hospital Bogenhausen Munich, Germany
  • Erich Hartmann
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group City Hospital Bogenhausen Munich, Germany
  • Philip Hoole
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group City Hospital Bogenhausen Munich, Germany
  • Contact author: Dr. Wolfram Ziegler, EKN Entwicklungsgruppe Klinische Neuropsychologie, Stadtisches Krankenhaus Bogenhausen, Dachauer StraBe 164, D-8000 Munchen 50, Germany.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1993
Syllabic Timing in Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 683-693. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.683
History: Received July 24, 1992 , Accepted February 11, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 683-693. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.683
History: Received July 24, 1992; Accepted February 11, 1993

A new, intensity-based method of measuring syllable duration was used to assess syllabic timing in 75 patients with dysarthria of predominantly traumatic and cerebro-vascular origin and in 30 normal subjects. The applied speech tasks included repetitions of sentences containing chains of plosive-vowel-syllables. The logarithm of the duration of the syllable carrying sentence accent proved to be particularly highly correlated with perceived speech rate. Among the potential sources of temporal variability, segmental influences and the influence of sentence stress were examined. Further, the between-sentence variation of syllable duration was assessed. The resulting measures of variability were correlated with the severity of dysarthric impairment. A strengthening of normal effects was found in the consonant-related variation, whereas intrinsic vowel effects and the influence of sentence stress were largely reduced. These results are discussed from the viewpoint of timing theories in speech and limb motor control. They are considered to provide a valuable background against which the speech impairments of specific neurologic groups can be tested.

Acknowledgment
This study was supported by a BMFT-grant. D. Y. von Cramon is acknowledged for his valuable contributions in many discussions and for his helpful cooperation in the screening of neurological and neuropsychological data. We are also grateful to M. Vogel and H. Schröter-Morasch, who provided us with clinical information concerning the patient group. Inge Wiesner is thanked for her organizational and technical assistance.
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