Visuomotor Tracking Ability of Young Adult Speakers This study was conducted to (a) study the ability of young adult subjects to track target signals with the lower lip, jaw, or larynx, (b) examine subjects’ abilities to track different sinusoidal frequencies and unpredictable target signals, and (c) test notions of response mode and predictive mode tracking reported for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1993
Visuomotor Tracking Ability of Young Adult Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jerald B. Moon
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Patricia Zebrowski
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Donald A. Robin
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • John W. Folkins
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Contact author: Jerry Moon, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, 121 WJSHC, Iowa City, IA 52242. Internet: JMOON@WJSHC-PO.SHC.UIOWA.EDU
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1993
Visuomotor Tracking Ability of Young Adult Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 672-682. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.672
History: Received May 19, 1992 , Accepted February 19, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1993, Vol. 36, 672-682. doi:10.1044/jshr.3604.672
History: Received May 19, 1992; Accepted February 19, 1993

This study was conducted to (a) study the ability of young adult subjects to track target signals with the lower lip, jaw, or larynx, (b) examine subjects’ abilities to track different sinusoidal frequencies and unpredictable target signals, and (c) test notions of response mode and predictive mode tracking reported for nonspeech structures by previous authors (e.g., Noble, Fitts, & Warren, 1955; Flowers, 1978). Twenty-five normal speakers tracked sinusoidal and unpredictable target signals using lower lip and jaw movement and fundamental frequency modulation. Tracking accuracy varied as a function of target frequency and articulator used to track. The results quantify the visuomotor tracking abilities of normal speakers using speech musculature and show the potential of visuomotor tracking tasks in the assessment of speech articulatory control.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank John Nichols, Carlin Hageman, and Michael Levinson for their assistance in data collection and analysis and Kice Brown for conducting the statistical analysis. This work was supported by NIDCD Grant # DC0O976.
This manuscript is based on a poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association meeting, Atlanta, 1991. This research was supported by NIH Grant DC00976.
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