Effects of Age on Serial Recall of Natural and Synthetic Speech The present study addressed the effects of aging on auditory serial-recall performance for natural and synthetic words. Word difficulty, measured in terms of frequency of occurrence and phonological similarity, and rate of presentation were also manipulated in an effort to determine which processes underlying serial-recall performance, if any, were affected ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1993
Effects of Age on Serial Recall of Natural and Synthetic Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Larry E. Humes
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences Indiana University Bloomington
  • Kathleen J. Nelson
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences Indiana University Bloomington
  • David B. Pisoni
    Department of Psychology Indiana University Bloomington
  • Scott E. Lively
    Department of Psychology Indiana University Bloomington
  • Contact author: Larry E. Humes, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1993
Effects of Age on Serial Recall of Natural and Synthetic Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 634-639. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.634
History: Received August 24, 1992 , Accepted February 5, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 634-639. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.634
History: Received August 24, 1992; Accepted February 5, 1993

The present study addressed the effects of aging on auditory serial-recall performance for natural and synthetic words. Word difficulty, measured in terms of frequency of occurrence and phonological similarity, and rate of presentation were also manipulated in an effort to determine which processes underlying serial-recall performance, if any, were affected by aging. Results indicated that age per se had little effect on short-term (working) memory as measured by the serial recall of monosyllabic words. Rate of presentation had little effect on recall for either subject group. Word difficulty, on the other hand, affected recall for both groups, with easy words being more readily recalled than hard words.

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