Vocal Communication in the First 18 Months of Life Fifty-one normally developing infants aged birth to 18 months, 10 or 11 in each of five age groups, were videorecorded in their homes before and after an expected change in the form of their vocalizations and under a set of conditions that reflected common daily occurrences. The vocalizations produced were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1993
Vocal Communication in the First 18 Months of Life
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rachel E. Stark
    Purdue University Lafayette, IN
  • Lynne E. Bernstein
    Gallaudet University Washington, DC
  • Marilyn E. Demorest
    University of Maryland Baltimore County Baltimore, MD
  • Contact author: Rachel E. Stark, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, 1353 Heavilon Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1353.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1993
Vocal Communication in the First 18 Months of Life
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 548-558. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.548
History: Received April 27, 1992 , Accepted November 5, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 548-558. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.548
History: Received April 27, 1992; Accepted November 5, 1992

Fifty-one normally developing infants aged birth to 18 months, 10 or 11 in each of five age groups, were videorecorded in their homes before and after an expected change in the form of their vocalizations and under a set of conditions that reflected common daily occurrences. The vocalizations produced were coded according to their communicative contexts, defined in nonvocal behavioral terms. Communicative codes were assigned to seven major categories. The distribution of codes across categories was found to be different for different age groups. It varied between the first and second observations; however, the pattern of change differed across age groups. Data from individuals were transformed to proportions, to control for individual differences in productivity. They were then found to reflect differences in level of development of vocal communication. It was concluded that vocal communication follows an orderly developmental sequence in normally developing infants in the first 18 months of life.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Maternal and Child Health (Grant #MC-R-250447) and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Grant #HD11970). The authors also acknowledge the assistance in coding of Liane Kuhnsman and the late Jennifer Bond.
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