Effect of Lung Volume on Voice Onset Time (VOT) This investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that voice onset time (VOT) varies as a function of lung volume. Recordings were made of five men as they repeated a phrase containing stressed /pi/ syllables, beginning at total lung capacity and ending at residual volume. VOT was found to be ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1993
Effect of Lung Volume on Voice Onset Time (VOT)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences and National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona Tucson
  • Nancy Pearl Solomon
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences and National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona Tucson
  • Thomas J. Hixon
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences and National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona Tucson
  • Contact author: Jeannette D. Hoit, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721.
  • Currently affiliated with the National Center for Voice and Speech, University of Iowa, Iowa City.
    Currently affiliated with the National Center for Voice and Speech, University of Iowa, Iowa City.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1993
Effect of Lung Volume on Voice Onset Time (VOT)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 516-520. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.516
History: Received March 30, 1992 , Accepted December 17, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 516-520. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.516
History: Received March 30, 1992; Accepted December 17, 1992

This investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that voice onset time (VOT) varies as a function of lung volume. Recordings were made of five men as they repeated a phrase containing stressed /pi/ syllables, beginning at total lung capacity and ending at residual volume. VOT was found to be longer at high lung volumes and shorter at low lung volumes in most cases. This finding points out the need to take lung volume into account when using VOT as an index of laryngeal behavior in both healthy individuals and those with speech disorders.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Clinical Investigator Development Award DC-00030, Research Grant DC-00281, Training Grant NS-07309, and National Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of Claudia V. Figueroa and James E. Washington to data analysis. Both were laboratory assistants under the University of Arizona Minority High School Laboratory Apprentice Program.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access