Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering Modifying Interjudge Agreement Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1993
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Merrilyn L. Gow
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Roger J. Ingham, Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1993
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 503-515. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.503
History: Received July 28, 1992 , Accepted December 13, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 503-515. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.503
History: Received July 28, 1992; Accepted December 13, 1992

This paper reports the results of two experiments that investigated interval-by-interval inter and intrajudge agreement for stuttered and nonstuttered speech intervals (4.0 sec). The first experiment demonstrated that interval-by-interval interjudge agreement could be significantly improved, and to satisfactory levels, by training judges to discriminate between experimenter-agreed intervals of stuttered and nonstuttered speech. The findings also showed that, independent of training, judges with relatively high intrajudge agreement also showed relatively higher interjudge agreement. The second experiment showed that interval-by-interval interjudge agreement was not significantly different if judges rated 4-sec speech intervals from different samples under three conditions: in random order, separated by 5-sec recording intervals; in correct order, also separated by 5-sec recording intervals; or after brief judgment signals that occurred every 4 sec during continuous samples. The implications of these findings for stuttering measurement are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to record their appreciation to the students who served as judges for this study; to Richard Moglia, who provided technical support; and to Peter Frank, who prepared the software. Our pool of recorded speech samples from which those used for this study were drawn was developed with assistance from Deborah Kully, Julia Boberg, Einer Boberg, and Richard Martin. Special thanks are owed to Janis Costello Ingham for her contributions to the formulation of this study and for her services as the fourth experimenter-judge. This research was supported by grant #DC00060-01A1 awarded to the first author by the National Institutes of Health.
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