Changes in Auditory-Vocal Reaction Times Within and Across Experimental Sessions Preliminary Observations Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1993
Changes in Auditory-Vocal Reaction Times Within and Across Experimental Sessions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shimon Sapir
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Ligang Li
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Ann B. Ragin
    Evanston Hospital Evanston, IL
  • James M. Dod
    Evanston Hospital Evanston, IL
  • Contact author: Shimon Sapir, PhD, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Frances Searle Building, 3–365, 2299 North Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3570.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1993
Changes in Auditory-Vocal Reaction Times Within and Across Experimental Sessions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 466-471. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.466
History: Received July 24, 1992 , Accepted December 7, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 466-471. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.466
History: Received July 24, 1992; Accepted December 7, 1992

Changes in auditory-vocal reaction times (AVRTs) within and across experimental sessions were studied in 13 healthy university students, all females. Subjects were required to listen to a series of synthesized vowels and utter each of the vowels as soon as they heard it. The vowels were /i/, /u/, /a/, /o/, and /æ/, each presented 14 times and all presented in random order and at irregular intervals (2.5–4.5 sec). The stimuli and the instructions were prerecorded and presented to the subjects binaurally at a comfortable intensity level via headphones in an IAC booth. Each subject performed the experimental task twice, a week apart. The stimuli and the vocal responses were tape recorded and later digitized and computer analyzed. Serial analysis of successive AVRTs revealed significant intra- and intersession decreases in AVRTs in the majority of the subjects. Increases in AVRTs were also seen, but much less frequently. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Acknowledgment
This study was supported in part by NIH/NIDCD grant 1R29 DC00591-01A1.
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