Maximum Performance Tests in Children With Developmental Spastic Dysarthria Three noninvasive Maximum Performance Tasks (MPT)—Maximum Sound Prolongation (MSP), Fundamental Frequency Range (FFR), and Maximum Repetition Rate (MRR)—were administered to 11 children with spastic dysarthria due to cerebral palsy and to 11 control children with normal speech in order to determine the value of the tasks for differentiating between these ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1993
Maximum Performance Tests in Children With Developmental Spastic Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Wit
    University Hospital Nijmegen Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • B. Maassen
    University Hospital Nijmegen Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • F. J. M. Gabreëls
    University Hospital Nijmegen Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • G. Thoonen
    University Hospital Nijmegen Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Contact author: B. Maassen, PhD, Interdisciplinary Child Neurology Centre and Institute of Medical Psychology, University Hospital Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1993
Maximum Performance Tests in Children With Developmental Spastic Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 452-459. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.452
History: Received September 3, 1991 , Accepted November 17, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1993, Vol. 36, 452-459. doi:10.1044/jshr.3603.452
History: Received September 3, 1991; Accepted November 17, 1992

Three noninvasive Maximum Performance Tasks (MPT)—Maximum Sound Prolongation (MSP), Fundamental Frequency Range (FFR), and Maximum Repetition Rate (MRR)—were administered to 11 children with spastic dysarthria due to cerebral palsy and to 11 control children with normal speech in order to determine the value of the tasks for differentiating between these groups of children. From the acoustic measurements, nine parameters were calculated, and in seven of them highly significant group differences were found. By adding the unweighted z-scores of four parameters (maximum sound prolongation, syllable duration, fundamental frequency range, inter-utterance variability of syllable duration), a composite z-score was constructed with nonoverlapping distributions for both groups. The authors conclude that maximum performance tasks, despite the large intrasubject and intersubject variability in both normal and pathological speakers, are powerful tools for detecting spastic dysarthria.

Acknowledgments
The present study was supported by the Prinses Beatrix Fonds, The Netherlands. The authors wish to express their appreciation to the rehabilitation centers for motorically handicapped children, the “Sint Maartenskliniek” in Nijmegen and the “Bio Revalidatie Centrum” in Arnhem, and to the elementary schools “de klokkenberg” in Nijmegen and “Nienekes van Hichtum” in Cuyk for their help with this study, and to Karen Degen and Bert de Swart at our department for judging the speech of the children. Finally we thank H. Reetz, at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, for putting a preliminary version of “Speech Lab” at our disposal.
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