Influences of Age and Hearing Loss on the Precedence Effect in Sound Localization Cranford, Boose, & Moore (1990a) reported that many elderly persons exhibit problems in perceiving the apparent location of fused auditory images in a sound localization task involving the Precedence Effect (PE). In the earlier study, differences in peripheral hearing sensitivity between young and elderly subjects were not controlled. In the ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 1993
Influences of Age and Hearing Loss on the Precedence Effect in Sound Localization
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jerry L. Cranford
    Wichita State University Wichita, KS
  • Marci A. Andres
    Wichita State University Wichita, KS
  • Kristi K. Piatz
    Wichita State University Wichita, KS
  • Kay L. Reissig
    Wichita State University Wichita, KS
  • Contact author: Jerry L. Cranford, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders & Sciences, Box 75, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67208.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Notes
Research Note   |   April 01, 1993
Influences of Age and Hearing Loss on the Precedence Effect in Sound Localization
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 437-441. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.437
History: Received March 6, 1992 , Accepted October 12, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 437-441. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.437
History: Received March 6, 1992; Accepted October 12, 1992

Cranford, Boose, & Moore (1990a) reported that many elderly persons exhibit problems in perceiving the apparent location of fused auditory images in a sound localization task involving the Precedence Effect (PE). In the earlier study, differences in peripheral hearing sensitivity between young and elderly subjects were not controlled. In the present study, four groups of young and elderly subjects, matched with respect to age and the presence or absence of sensorineural hearing loss, were examined to determine the effects of these two factors on performance with the PE task. Although significantly poorer performances on the PE task were found to be associated with both increased age and hearing loss, additional tentative evidence was obtained that the presence of hearing loss may have a relatively greater detrimental effect on the performance of at least some elderly subjects than it does on younger persons.

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