Benefit From Visual Cues in Auditory-Visual Speech Recognition by Middle-Aged and Elderly Persons The benefit derived from visual cues in auditory-visual speech recognition and patterns of auditory and visual consonant confusions were compared for 20 middle-aged and 20 elderly men who were moderately to severely hearing impaired. Consonant-vowel nonsense syllables and CID sentences were presented to the subjects under auditory-only, visual-only, and auditory-visual ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Benefit From Visual Cues in Auditory-Visual Speech Recognition by Middle-Aged and Elderly Persons
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center Washington, DC
  • Debra A. Busacco
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center Washington, DC
  • Allen A. Montgomery
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center Washington, DC
  • Currently affiliated with Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.
    Currently affiliated with Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.×
  • Currently affiliated with the University of South Carolina, Columbia.
    Currently affiliated with the University of South Carolina, Columbia.×
  • Contact author: Brian E. Walden, PhD, Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307-5001.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Benefit From Visual Cues in Auditory-Visual Speech Recognition by Middle-Aged and Elderly Persons
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 431-436. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.431
History: Received July 13, 1992 , Accepted December 21, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 431-436. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.431
History: Received July 13, 1992; Accepted December 21, 1992

The benefit derived from visual cues in auditory-visual speech recognition and patterns of auditory and visual consonant confusions were compared for 20 middle-aged and 20 elderly men who were moderately to severely hearing impaired. Consonant-vowel nonsense syllables and CID sentences were presented to the subjects under auditory-only, visual-only, and auditory-visual test conditions. Benefit was defined as the difference between the scores in the auditory-only and auditory-visual conditions. The results revealed that the middle-aged and elderly subjects obtained similar benefit from visual cues in auditory-visual speech recognition. Further, patterns of consonant confusions were similar for the two groups.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Department of Clinical Investigation, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, under Work Unit #2575, and was approved by the Center’s Human Use Committee. All subjects studied in this investigation provided written informed consent prior to their participation. The opinions and assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense. The contributions of Marilyn Demorest, Honor O’Malley, Robert Prosek, and Seymour Rigrodsky are gratefully acknowledged. This paper is based on doctoral research conducted by the second author.
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