Tracking of "Moving" Fused Auditory Images by Children Recent investigations (Cranford, Boose, & Moore, 1990a,b; Moore, Cranford, & Rahn, 1990) studied the ability of normal adult subjects to localize sounds under conditions that elicit the Precedence Effect. In different tests, subjects were required either to report the perceived location of a stationary fused auditory image (FAI) or track ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Tracking of "Moving" Fused Auditory Images by Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jerry L. Cranford
    Wichita State University Wichita, KS
  • Michael Morgan
    Wichita State University Wichita, KS
  • Rosalind Scudder
    Wichita State University Wichita, KS
  • Christopher Moore
    Wichita State University Wichita, KS
  • Currently affiliated with SUNY Plattsburgh, Plattsburgh, NY.
    Currently affiliated with SUNY Plattsburgh, Plattsburgh, NY.×
  • Currently affiliated with University of Pittsburgh, Plttsburgh, PA.
    Currently affiliated with University of Pittsburgh, Plttsburgh, PA.×
  • Contact author: Jerry L. Cranford, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders & Sciences, Box 75, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67208.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Tracking of "Moving" Fused Auditory Images by Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 424-430. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.424
History: Received April 9, 1992 , Accepted October 12, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 424-430. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.424
History: Received April 9, 1992; Accepted October 12, 1992

Recent investigations (Cranford, Boose, & Moore, 1990a,b; Moore, Cranford, & Rahn, 1990) studied the ability of normal adult subjects to localize sounds under conditions that elicit the Precedence Effect. In different tests, subjects were required either to report the perceived location of a stationary fused auditory image (FAI) or track the apparent motion of a "moving" FAI. Movement of the FAI was simulated by incrementally varying the delay between pairs of clicks presented, one each, from two matched loudspeakers placed on opposite sides of the listener. In the present study, groups of normally developing children, ranging in age from 6 to 12 years of age, were tested with these two procedures. Although subjects performed at normal adult levels with the stationary FAI test, a significant age-related trend was observed with the moving FAI test. The younger children exhibited poorer tracking performances than did the older children. These results provide evidence that significant changes in binaural temporal processing abilities may occur in the early childhood years.

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