Importance of Patient and Processor Variables in Determining Outcomes With Cochlear Implants Within-subjects comparisons of processing strategies for cochlear implants are reviewed. Compressed analog strategies were compared to interleaved pulses strategies in tests with one group of 8 subjects, and to continuous interleaved sampling strategies in tests with another group of 11 subjects. The tests included open-set recognition of words and sentences. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Importance of Patient and Processor Variables in Determining Outcomes With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Blake S. Wilson
    Research Triangle Institute and Duke University Medical Center
  • Dewey T. Lawson
    Research Triangle Institute and Duke University Medical Center
  • Charles C. Finley
    Research Triangle Institute and Duke University Medical Center
  • Robert D. Wolford
    Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC
  • Contact author: Blake S. Wilson, Neuroscience Program, Research Triangle Institute, P.O. Box 12194, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194.
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Importance of Patient and Processor Variables in Determining Outcomes With Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 373-379. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.373
History: Received February 3, 1992 , Accepted September 9, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 373-379. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.373
History: Received February 3, 1992; Accepted September 9, 1992

Within-subjects comparisons of processing strategies for cochlear implants are reviewed. Compressed analog strategies were compared to interleaved pulses strategies in tests with one group of 8 subjects, and to continuous interleaved sampling strategies in tests with another group of 11 subjects. The tests included open-set recognition of words and sentences. The results show that, while different strategies may produce quite different outcomes across subjects, individual performances with one processing strategy are significantly correlated with those of alternative strategies. These findings emphasize the importance of patient variables in determining outcomes across a variety of prosthesis designs.

Acknowledgments
We thank the subjects of the described studies for their enthusiastic participation. We also are pleased to acknowledge the important scientific contributions of D. K. Eddington, F. T. Hambrecht, D. K. Kessler, M. M. Merzenich, W. M. Rabinowitz, S. J. Waters, M. W. White, and M. Zerbi. This work was supported by NIH projects N01-NS-5-2396 and N01-DC-9-2401, through the Neural Prosthesis Program.
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