Temporal Analysis in Children This study investigated the development of temporal resolution as a function of frequency region using a modified masking period pattern paradigm. This paradigm also allowed age-dependent comparisons of within-channel (temporal resolution) versus across-channel (comodulation masking release [CMR]) processing of temporal information to be made in the same listeners. The results ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Temporal Analysis in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John H. Grose
    Division of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery School of Medicine The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Joseph W. Hall, III
    Division of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery School of Medicine The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Carol Gibbs
    Division of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery School of Medicine The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Temporal Analysis in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 351-356. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.351
History: Received March 30, 1992 , Accepted August 17, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 351-356. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.351
History: Received March 30, 1992; Accepted August 17, 1992

This study investigated the development of temporal resolution as a function of frequency region using a modified masking period pattern paradigm. This paradigm also allowed age-dependent comparisons of within-channel (temporal resolution) versus across-channel (comodulation masking release [CMR]) processing of temporal information to be made in the same listeners. The results indicated that temporal resolution improves with age. At low frequencies, this improvement continues beyond 10 years of age, whereas at high frequencies performance approaches adult levels by about age 6. Although it is reasonable to expect an association between CMR and temporal acuity, the measure of CMR did not show a significant age effect. The possibility was raised that the poorer temporal resolution of children may not reflect simply a deficiency in peripheral processing of temporal information.

Acknowledgments
We thank Lynne Werner and Fred Wightman for their comments on an earlier draft of this paper. The research was supported by grant 5 R01 DC00397 from NIH NIDCD.
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