A System for Quantifying the Informativeness and Efficiency of the Connected Speech of Adults With Aphasia A standardized rule-based scoring system, the Correct Information Unit (CIU) analysis, was used to evaluate the informativeness and efficiency of the connected speech of 20 non-brain-damaged adults and 20 adults with aphasia in response to 10 elicitation stimuli. The interjudge reliability of the scoring system proved to be high, as ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
A System for Quantifying the Informativeness and Efficiency of the Connected Speech of Adults With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda E. Nicholas
    Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Robert H. Brookshire
    Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Minnesota Minneapolis
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
A System for Quantifying the Informativeness and Efficiency of the Connected Speech of Adults With Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 338-350. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.338
History: Received June 19, 1992 , Accepted October 27, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 338-350. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.338
History: Received June 19, 1992; Accepted October 27, 1992

A standardized rule-based scoring system, the Correct Information Unit (CIU) analysis, was used to evaluate the informativeness and efficiency of the connected speech of 20 non-brain-damaged adults and 20 adults with aphasia in response to 10 elicitation stimuli. The interjudge reliability of the scoring system proved to be high, as did the session-to-session stability of performance on measures. There was a significant difference between the non-brain-damaged and aphasic speakers on each of the five measures derived from CIU and word counts. However, the three calculated measures (words per minute, percent CIUs, and CIUs per minute) more dependably separated aphasic from non-brain-damaged speakers on an individual basis than the two counts (number of words and number of CIUs).

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Research Service. We want to thank Donald MacLennan, Julia Edgar, and Annalisa Margheri for their assistance with this research and Cindy Busch, whose dissertation research stimulated our interest in rule–based systems for scoring the informativeness and efficiency of connected speech. We also want to thank Connie Tompkins, Terry Wertz, and an anonymous reviewer for their editorial assistance.
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