Speech Breathing in Parkinson’s Disease Breathing was investigated in 14 male subjects with Parkinson’s disease and 14 healthy male control subjects. Kinematic, spirometric, acoustic, and pressure data were used to assess function during resting tidal breathing, reading aloud, and monologue production. Data were collected at two times during the drug cycle for subjects with Parkinson’s ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Speech Breathing in Parkinson’s Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Pearl Solomon
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Thomas J. Hixon
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Currently affiliated with the National Center for Voice and Speech, University of Iowa, Iowa City.
    Currently affiliated with the National Center for Voice and Speech, University of Iowa, Iowa City.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Speech Breathing in Parkinson’s Disease
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 294-310. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.294
History: Received May 6, 1992 , Accepted December 7, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 294-310. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.294
History: Received May 6, 1992; Accepted December 7, 1992

Breathing was investigated in 14 male subjects with Parkinson’s disease and 14 healthy male control subjects. Kinematic, spirometric, acoustic, and pressure data were used to assess function during resting tidal breathing, reading aloud, and monologue production. Data were collected at two times during the drug cycle for subjects with Parkinson’s disease. During resting tidal breathing, subjects with Parkinson’s disease, on average, had a faster breathing rate, greater minute ventilation, and smaller relative contribution of the rib cage to lung volume change than did healthy control subjects. During speech breathing, rib cage volume was smaller and abdominal volume was larger at initiation of the breath groups for subjects with Parkinson’s disease than for healthy control subjects. Subjects with Parkinson’s disease produced fewer words and spent less time producing speech per breath group and tended to have a faster interpause speech rate than did healthy control subjects. There was no difference between groups for duration of inspirations between speech breath groups. Oral pressure was lower for subjects with Parkinson’s disease but estimated tracheal pressure did not differ between the two subject groups. Few differences were found between the two times in the drug cycle for resting and speech breathing. Results provide indirect evidence for reduced relative compliance of the rib cage to the abdomen for subjects with Parkinson’s disease as compared to healthy control subjects. In addition, the results support the possibility of inadequate valving of the air stream for subjects with Parkinson’s disease.

Acknowledgments
This research represents a portion of a dissertation submitted to the University of Arizona by the first author. It was supported in part by Research Grant DC-00281, Training Grant NS-07309, a Program Development Award by the Graduate College at the University of Arizona, and Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409. The first author gratefully acknowledges Research and Training Center Grant DC-00976 (University of Iowa) for providing support during the preparation of this manuscript.
We would like to thank the many people who assisted us with this project in various ways, in particular, Peter Watson, Mike Trosset, Jenny Hoit, Bob Lansing, Kathryn Bayles, Janice Monnot, John Steffes, Andrea Ezell, Lucinda Weaver, and Pat Jones. The first author is especially indebted to Jonathan Solomon for his encouragement and support.
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