Differences Between Stutterers' and Nonstutterers' Short-Term Recall and Recognition Performance Longer rehearsal times presumably reduce the efficiency of rehearsal and, hence, of short-term recall. The present experiment examined the question as to whether the slower subvocalization rate of people who stutter is correlated with inferior short-term serial recall and recognition performance. Rate of overt articulation was taken as a measure ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Differences Between Stutterers' and Nonstutterers' Short-Term Recall and Recognition Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Fakultät für Psychologie Ruhr- Universität Bochum Bochum, Germany
  • Contact author: Hans-Georg Bosshardt, Fakultat fr Psychologie der Ruhr-UniversitAt Bochum, Postfach 102148, D-W-4630 Bochum, Germany.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Differences Between Stutterers' and Nonstutterers' Short-Term Recall and Recognition Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 286-293. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.286
History: Received January 2, 1992 , Accepted October 20, 1992
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1993, Vol. 36, 286-293. doi:10.1044/jshr.3602.286
History: Received January 2, 1992; Accepted October 20, 1992

Longer rehearsal times presumably reduce the efficiency of rehearsal and, hence, of short-term recall. The present experiment examined the question as to whether the slower subvocalization rate of people who stutter is correlated with inferior short-term serial recall and recognition performance. Rate of overt articulation was taken as a measure of rehearsal time. Lists of four nonlexical CVC syllables were presented for short-term serial recall and for short-term recognition. Nineteen adults who stutter and 30 nonstutterers participated in the experiment. In the serial reproduction task the subjects who stuttered reproduced significantly fewer items correctly than did nonstutterers. Recognition performance was measured by nonparametric measures of sensitivity and bias as defined in signal detection theory. The stuttering subjects had a significantly lower sensitivity resulting primarily from a higher false alarm rate. Rate of overt articulation was significantly related to one measure of short-term recall but not to the sensitivity of recognition. These results were interpreted as suggesting that people who stutter have slower phonological encoding and rehearsal times, that they make less use of nonphonological forms of coding than do nonstutterers, and that within their phonological system, activation more easily spills over to similar items.

Acknowledgments
This is a modified version of a paper read at the International Conference on Memory, University of Lancaster, July 15–19,1991.
I gratefully acknowledge the help of Hartwig Fuhrmann in running the experiment and in performing statistical computations, of Joachim Winzier in programming the experiment, and of Donald Goodwin with English style. I also wish to thank Dale Metz, an anonymous reviewer, and especially Woodruff Starkweather for their valuable comments and suggestions on an earlier version.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access